Rosacea Home > Ocular Rosacea

Rosacea is a skin disease that affects more than 14 million people in the United States. When it affects the skin around the eyes, it is known as ocular rosacea. Approximately 50 percent of people who have rosacea will develop this form of the condition. Although there is no cure, it can be treated and controlled through good eyelid hygiene, oral antibiotics, and steroid eye drops.

What Is Ocular Rosacea?

Rosacea is a chronic disease that affects the skin. When it affects the skin around the eyes, it is called ocular rosacea. The condition is characterized by redness, pimples, and, in advanced stages, thickened skin. Although rosacea usually affects the face, it can affect other parts of the upper body.
 
Approximately 14 million people in the United States have rosacea, and it is more common in women (particularly during menopause) than in men. Although rosacea occurs more frequently in people with fair skin, it can occur in people of any skin color. Despite how common rosacea is, many people with this condition go undiagnosed.
 

What Causes It?

Doctors do not know the exact causes of ocular rosacea. However, some people believe that one or more of the following triggers can make their ocular rosacea worse:
 
  • Heat (including hot baths)
  • Heavy exercise
  • Sunlight
  • Winds
  • Very cold temperatures
  • Hot or spicy foods and drinks
  • Drinking alcohol
  • Menopause
  • Emotional stress.
 
Written by/reviewed by:
Last reviewed by: Arthur Schoenstadt, MD
Last updated/reviewed:
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